Origins of Assessment – Part 4: Epilogue

The structure of the global economy today is quite different compared to the way it was in the industrial era. Instead of having an economic system rooted in the manufacture and delivery of physical goods, the economy of leading nations today shows greater dependence on the manufacture and delivery of information products and services. The … Continue reading Origins of Assessment – Part 4: Epilogue

Origins of Assessment – Part 3: The Myth of the Metals

The Context of Schooling: 1905-1950 As compulsory school attendance was more rigorously enforced towards the end of the nineteenth century, this led to a much more socially and culturally diverse student population in schools. Educators and school boards continued to use written tests to evaluate pupils and schools, but while testing was seen as useful … Continue reading Origins of Assessment – Part 3: The Myth of the Metals

Origins of Assessment – Part 2: All That Counts Shall Be Counted

The Context of Schooling: 1845-1905 The educational reforms that took place in Canada in the 1840s echoed those that took place in the United States. In 1837, Massachusetts became the first state in America to establish a Board of Education, headed by reformer Horace Mann. Mann advocated for reforms such as age-graded classrooms, uniform textbooks, … Continue reading Origins of Assessment – Part 2: All That Counts Shall Be Counted

Origins of Assessment – Part 1: Establishing the Competitive Ideal

Introduction This series of posts explores the history of educational assessment in North America, with an emphasis on Canada, from the years 1800 to 1950. For the purposes of this analysis, this timespan has been divided into three major intervals: (1) 1800-1845, representing the era of “loud” schooling and oral exhibitions, (2) 1845-1905, representing the advent … Continue reading Origins of Assessment – Part 1: Establishing the Competitive Ideal